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A tow truck operator in Nova Scotia narrowly escaped being struck by a car while responding to a crash on a busy highway. Jason Beaton, the operator, is speaking out about the importance of drivers following the Slow Down, Move Over legislation when passing emergency responders. Beaton was assisting a driver whose vehicle had slid off the road when another vehicle lost control and hit his tow truck. He was shaken but uninjured, and photos of the scene show the damaged truck with a message urging drivers to follow the law. According to provincial regulations, drivers must slow down to 60 km/h or the speed limit if lower when passing emergency vehicles with their lights flashing and move into another lane if possible. Beaton’s colleague, Andrew Peterson, emphasizes the importance of including tow trucks under this legislation after a tragic incident in New Brunswick involving a police officer.

Peterson highlights the lack of respect for tow trucks’ flashing yellow lights compared to police or fire vehicles, emphasizing that compliance with the law can prevent dangerous situations. He points to the 2017 crash in New Brunswick that resulted in the death of RCMP Const. Francis Deschenes as a poignant example of the consequences of not following the Slow Down, Move Over legislation. Despite the seriousness of the incident, the driver responsible was not fined under the specific law but for driving too fast for the conditions. Beaton underscores the importance of being mindful of emergency personnel on highways to prevent accidents and ensure everyone’s safety. He stresses the need for drivers to be attentive and considerate to avoid potential tragedies on the road.

Beaton’s experience serves as a reminder of the constant dangers tow truck operators face while working on the highway. He expresses his fear for his life every time he has to respond to a call, emphasizing the need for drivers to be cautious and follow the law to protect emergency responders. The incident on the highway near Truro illustrates the potential risks tow truck operators are exposed to daily and the importance of drivers adhering to regulations to prevent accidents. Beaton’s decision to speak out about his close call is driven by a desire to raise awareness and ensure that everyone can return home safely after a day’s work on the road.

The Slow Down, Move Over legislation is designed to protect emergency personnel, including tow truck operators, from the dangers of passing vehicles on highways. Beaton and Peterson advocate for greater recognition of tow trucks under this law to enhance safety for all roadside workers. The tragic incident in New Brunswick involving the death of a police officer reinforces the importance of drivers respecting emergency responders and following the regulations in place. Both Beaton and Peterson stress the need for drivers to be more attentive and considerate on the road to prevent accidents and save lives.

In conclusion, the story of the tow truck operator in Nova Scotia highlights the risks and challenges faced by roadside workers and the importance of drivers complying with the Slow Down, Move Over legislation. Beaton’s experience serves as a stark reminder of the potential dangers on the highway and the need for increased awareness and caution from drivers. The incident near Truro underscores the ongoing threat tow truck operators face and the critical role of adhering to safety regulations to prevent accidents. By speaking out about his near miss, Beaton hopes to educate the public and ensure that all emergency responders can return home safely after a day’s work on the road.

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