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Meghan Trainor’s intensive care ordeal laid bare

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New Australian Idol judge Meghan Trainor has opened up about the “rough start” her son Riley had in life – and how nurses made her feel bad for taking antidepressants while pregnant.

The 28-year-old American singer welcomed baby boy Riley in 2021, but it was a complicated birth.

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He was in the breech position and was born via a cesarean section, then needed to be fed through a tube in intensive care at first.

“It was one of those horror stories where he didn’t cry,” Trainor told TODAY last year.

“He didn’t make noise when he came out.

“I was like, ‘Why isn’t he crying?’ Then they told me he was having breathing issues. It was terrifying.”

In a new interview with Romper, Trainor said she felt “blamed” by nurses for her baby’s health after Riley had trouble waking up for feedings and was often “very sleepy.”

“They kept asking me if I was on antidepressants during the pregnancy, and I was, but I was on the lowest dose possible, and all my doctors said it was safe and wouldn’t affect him,” she revealed.

Meghan Trainor will star as a judge on Australian Idol 2023. Credit: Jason Merritt/TERM/Getty Images

“It was really f***ed up.

“They had no name for what was wrong.”

Now 19 months old, Riley is doing well and Trainor is about to start trying for baby number two with her husband, actor Daryl Sabara.

According to Angela Bianco, a maternal-foetal medicine specialist based in the US, there is generally no need for women to “taper off” antidepressants during pregnancy.

“All of the data that we have to counsel patients is very reassuring,” she told TODAY.

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“We have a decent amount of retrospective data that seem to be associated with excellent pregnancy outcomes.

“We strongly advocate for women that need antidepressants and anxiolytics (anxiety-reducing medicines) to stay on their medication, and not stop because they’re pregnant or trying to get pregnant.”

Another medical expert, Nicole Warren from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, has congratulated Trainor for bringing the subject to the forefront.

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“If a person is stable on an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and then goes off it, they make experience worsening symptoms of depression,” she said.

“And we know that experiencing depression is associated with poor outcomes, such as impaired judgment.

“You could also have insomnia, anxiety and suicidal ideation.”

Meghan Trainor with baby Riley. Credit: Instagram/MeghanTrainor

However, there are some risks involved in taking antidepressants during pregnancy, Warren noted.

One condition, known as PNAS, or poor neonatal adaptation syndrome, results in jitteriness, feeding difficulties and hypoglycemia (a drop in blood glucose levels).

But Warren said PNAS is usually a temporary condition and does not require any kind of specialist care or medical intervention.

In an interview with TODAY after Riley’s birth, Trainor spoke openly about taking antidepressants during her pregnancy.

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“I made sure it was safe and talked to my doctors,” she revealed.

“They told me, ‘if you’re happy, then your body will be happy and then you’re baby will be happy.’

“I haven’t had any postpartum depression or anything.

“I think the medicine definitely helped.”

Speaking recently about her role as an Australian Idol judge, the All About That Bass singer said she was excited to be part of an “iconic” show.

Meghan Trainor will be a judge on the new season of Australian Idol. Credit: Channel Seven

“I grew up watching it and I am honoured to be involved,” she said.

“I can’t wait to sit front row and meet new talent.

“I haven’t been to Australia since 2015, so I’m excited to get to see the whole country and basically get to live there!”

If you need help in a crisis, call Lifeline on 13 11 14. For further information about depression contact beyondblue on 1300224636 or talk to your GP, local health professional or someone you trust.

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Source: 7News